An Amusing Conspiracy Theory

I started a new email account a few days ago with Mail.com. I had no particular reason for choosing Mail.com – just another email provider. What was important was the Talktalk Webmail has been horrendous for months and months in that it has been constantly and intermittently  inaccessible, but my email address at Talktalk is my first and original email address, and I am fond of it. Also, Talktalk is my phone and internet provider.

Having set up the new Mail.com email address, I managed to get into Webmail and arrange for my emails to copied to the Mail.com address. The whole arrangement is temporary until I decide to sort the whole thing out by moving from Talktalk.

Anyway, when I opened the Mail.com account, I got a survey from Tiscali, which has something to do with Mail.com. There was no ‘not today’ button so I completed it as rapidly as possible, which means entering ‘don’t know’ most of the time.

As a reward for completing the utterly pointless survey, I was offered a selection of prizes, claimed to be worth £75. The prizes tend to be useless stuff like creams and deodorants, but this one included an ecig starter pack. Oddly enough, I have seen ecig starter packs used as prizes in surveys before on more than one occasion. It sticks in your mind because an ecig starter pack stands out from the collection of creams and deodorants.

Anyway, I decided to amuse myself, and decided to go for the ecig starter pack. It really is jolly amusing. The starter pack is supposed to be worth £75, and it is free. But they demanded a contribution to the postage cost, which they said was about £10, so they demanded that I pay about £5. Giggle, giggle, giggle. OK, I said to myself, let’s amuse ourself. Let’s go with it and see what happens. £5 is no great cost for a bit of fun.

So I rode with it and paid the £5. What would seriously annoy me would be if it turned out that I received a cig-alike ‘puritane’ ecig. I expect a ‘starter pack worth £75’.

Oddly enough, even though it is a couple of years since Dick Puddlecote offered some Puritane ecigs free to firstcommers,  that ecig still works. I suppose that is because it has just say in my jar of ‘useful implements’. Actually, it is not bad at all. It is not quite the tobacco taste, but is a near approximation.

Erm… I vaguely remember first tasting the Puritane and registering that it did NOT taste like tobacco much at all. It was quite pleasant but NOT tobacco tasting.

So here is my amusing conspiracy theory. TobcoMs have been gradually changing the taste of tobacco cigs to become much the same as ecig tastes.

Is that not a delicious theory? Genuine tobacco prohibitionists would be delighted, because, gradually, the populace would forget the real taste of tobacco. They would only know the taste of ecigs.

So, in my deranged conspiracy, TobcoMs secure their basic profit centre of genuine smokers while replacing them with vapers who think that they are acting of their own free will. Meanwhile, TobcoN achieves its targets of, say, a 2% per an reduction in smoking, thus only marginally reducing the vast theft of smokers’ income year on year. Needless to say, politicians have no part in this process. they do as they are told “for the children”, little understanding that their capitulation paves the way for more manipulation.

Revolution is inevitable. It must be so. Regulation has reached such a pitch that no one can avoid doing something illegal. For example, tobacco duty is not just due on tobacco, according to the LAW. ANYTHING that can be smoked is liable for tobacco duty. That is what the LAW says.

What does the phrase ‘can be smoked’ mean? It is nonsense. But MPs did not see the utter stupidity of that phrase and passed it. As a result, we have a law which is nonsense.

The proper way to proceed if to ignore the EU Tobacco Products Directive. That is where TobcoMs went wrong. They should have ignored the OZ Plain Packaging law and let the Oz Authorities ban the import of cigs.

There comes a point where the nettle has to be grasped. TobcoMs failed to grasp the nettle in Oz. Instead, they took the easy option, which was a law case. Once that failed, they could just do what the Oz Gov demanded, to their eventual advantage as regards competition.

There is nothing outlandish about my ‘thought experiment’.

But what is outlandish is that our elected MP, who are specifically elected to STOP the mind-control, are actively engaged in promoting it.

 

Advertisements

%d bloggers like this: