So the Tobacco Directive (Including Ecigs) Has Been Passed

And, as I have read, by a substantial majority of some 300 to 60 votes.

But who cares?

What is interesting to me is that “Free Trade” within the EU States has been upheld, as far as I can see. One thing that concerned me was that the directive might permit a State to stop a person from importing, for his own use, tobacco products which do not conform to an individual State’s internal laws about plain packaging. As far as I can see, such a possibility is still regarded as contrary to the Internal Market ideals. Thus, if the UK adopted PP, that would not stop me from buying fags in, say, Spain which did not conform. In fact, as I understand it, this possibility has already been kicked into touch when Iceland tried to impose unilateral demands that imported beers must bear a legend saying specifically “Alcoholic Beverage” (or something like that). That demand was struck down because it imposed a duty which was especially onerous on non-Icelandic companies.

But there are other matters. This directive will take years and years to implement in its entirety. In fact, there are strong possibilities that the mishmash will get not further than an ideology. No State in the EU is obliged to enact laws to put the directive into effect.

But it goes further. Because of the massive time-lapse between the hysterical vote and real life, we should be able to continue to grow our own stuff and import leaf ad inf, for all intents. This is because of the emphasis which has been placed upon peripherals by the EU. We should all be pleased that the EU Zealots are buggering about with with pics on packets while we are ‘making our own arrangements’.

As regards ecigs …. Well, that is for vapers to decide. The courageous course of action for vapers and ecig manufacturers and ecig liquid manufactures, is to refuse to comply. They could do so because they hold “the high moral ground”. But I doubt that they have the courage. It all depends upon whether or not they regard themselves as ‘purveyors of tobacco products’.

But the Zealots have subtly changed the emphasis from ‘smoke’ to ‘nicotine’.

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Let’s face it. These Eurocrats do not represent us at all. Let it run – who cares. They amass money for themselves, but they die anyway. Who cares. Sod them. Sod them all.

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7 Responses to “So the Tobacco Directive (Including Ecigs) Has Been Passed”

  1. prog Says:

    It’s particularly been about nicotine ever since patches became a major money spinner. The fact that they are practically useless ensured a healthy and long term return. Until recently – TC is pissed off by the new ‘ice cream van’ on the block. Also because smoking cessation centres will struggle to compete. If they become totally unviable, they’re be less ‘on the ground’ pressure on LAs to pursue smokers.

    • junican Says:

      I think that there has recently been a concerted plan put into effect by the Tobacco Controls in the WHO to move ‘the harm’ from smoking to nicotine. Their argument against ecigs is that the nicotine supply is not controlled, implying that it is in gummy patches. They carefully overlook the fact that a person could eat stacks of gum by mistake (as has happened) or stick patches all over his body at the same time.
      But those arguments are just for show. The reality is simple power play and money.

  2. bill Says:

    It is interest that, while almost all parties involved in the e-cig debate agree that e-cigs are far less harmful than cigarettes, they cannot make the connection to the fact that it would be far better to have people vaping than smoking.

    I assume that the connection is solidly blocked by dollars/pounds provided by the pharma industry. As noted by prog, the medically authorized, mostly useless, nicotine replacement treatments are a huge money maker for pharma. They don’t want people to quit smoking – if their replacement treatments worked then they would lose victims and the money they have to spend on those treatments.

    So the EU creates a directive that, if carried out by the zealots, will force people back to cigarettes.

    Stupidity (or greed) reigns supreme, both in the EU and in the US.

    • beobrigitte Says:

      It is interest that, while almost all parties involved in the e-cig debate agree that e-cigs are far less harmful than cigarettes, they cannot make the connection to the fact that it would be far better to have people vaping than smoking.

      Can we go back a good number of years – the smoking ban was dictated only after the anti-smoking zealots loudly lamented the (fictional) danger of passive smoke to “other people” and struck deal after deal with various governments.
      Until then, the right to chose whatever (as long as it does not cause harm to someone else) you do to yourself was YOUR OWN business.
      With respect to the e-cig: WHAT harm does it cause to the vaper? More so, WHAT harm does it cause to “other people”?
      To state that there is no “long term experience” is a blatant lie. The “experience” arises from various asthma inhalers (e.g. propylene glycol) which are prescribed to even toddler aged children.

      By now I have read so many “analyses” of e-cigs – and laughed!!!

  3. So the Tobacco Directive (Including Ecigs) Has ... Says:

    […] And, as I have read, by a substantial majority of some 300 to 60 votes. But who cares? What is interesting to me is that “Free Trade” within the EU States has been upheld, as far as I can see. One thing that concerned me was that the directive might permit a State to stop a person from importing, for his own use, tobacco products which do not conform to an individual State’s internal laws about plain packaging. As far as I can see, such a possibility is still regarded as contrary to the Internal Market ideals. Thus, if the UK adopted PP, that would not stop me from buying fags in, say, Spain which did not conform. In fact, as I understand it, this possibility has already been kicked into touch when Iceland tried to impose unilateral demands that imported beers must bear a legend saying specifically “Alcoholic Beverage” (or something like that). That demand was struck down because it imposed a duty which was especially onerous on non-Icelandic companies.  […]

  4. beobrigitte Says:

    What is interesting to me is that “Free Trade” within the EU States has been upheld, as far as I can see.

    Of course it will be upheld. If you buy your e.g. spanish cigarettes over the internet, you will find that this country slaps it’s OWN cigarette tax on a packet of 20. The “loophole” of travellers being able to bring back EU country tobacco/cigarettes in almost unlimited amounts (for own use) will not put much of a dent into this country’s finances. A stop on “free trade” within the EU states would. The anti-smoking zealots hate this little bit.

    I have watched at Dover harbour some really bizarre scenes. People unloading crate after crate of beer (for own use) bought in Calais. One of them was a local and he told me that he does a monthly shop for beer and cigarettes in the area surrounding Calais. “Lucky you!!!” was my reply.

    It might take some time until this “Tobacco Directive” shows it’s ugly face to the public. In the meantime, I am inviting my German/Austrian/Polish/Czech friends over here. They all know that I really do appreciate TOBACCO!!!
    Of course I hop on £100 return flights to these countries as well.
    Nevertheless, I also have begun to stack up on e-cig cartridges, as well and am always on the lookout for the “man-with-a-van”.

    Hell will freeze over before I buy 1 more pack of 50g tobacco in England.

    • junican Says:

      The Zealots have been trying for years to get tobacco in any form given special treatment in the EU free trade regulations – so far without success. I looked carefully at the new directive to see whether there was any implication of regulation of cross-border activity, but, apart from moaning about it, there were no actual ‘threats’. I think that the UK and Ireland can only get away with the ridiculously high taxes because we are islands so that it is easier for customs to interrupt supplies. But smugglers must, by the nature of their trade, be highly inventive, When a cargo is discovered and confiscated, then they will learn from it and improve their methods. Frankly, as regards the occasional capture of huge quantities, I suspect the they result from tip-offs.
      Like you, I have not bought any tobacco in the UK for years. My trip to Spain has been fruitful in that respect.

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